Update 9-29-2013

The peppers suffered from too many transplants. But, they are quick to bounce back. Here is a pic of them from today:

Pepper from seed 9-29

Pepper from seed 9-29

This article is going to talk about how to Grow Seeds from Store Bought Peppers. First, let’s get a few things out of the way

  • In order for seeds to be viable, the pepper they are taken from must (should) be ripe. Seeds from green peppers are not likely to be viable, though some may be.
  • When handling hot peppers I recommend using gloves, and even a face mask, if you are sensitive. EVERY time I have taken seeds from a hot pepper my lips have started tingling for some reason.
  • These instructions should work for any pepper. The ones I am using here is a chili that is native to the Dominican Republic
Peppers Ready for Seed Taking

Peppers Ready for Seed Taking

Peppers Ready for Seed TakingPeppers Ready for Seed Taking

Peppers Ready for Seed Taking

 

Open the Peppers with a Sharp Knife

Open the Peppers with a Sharp Knife

 

The next step is to remove the seeds with a knife and dry them out. You can place them on a napkin if you like. I placed mine in a colander. The dry pretty quickly.

Here are some thing to remember:

  • Some peppers will have the “placenta,” seed pod, turn mushy. For example, in the peppers above the seed pods was mushy and I found it impossible to clean the seeds off completely. I dried them with seed pod “paste” all over them. When I planted them the seeds began to mold, but that did not seem to affect germination, which happened within about a week.
  • Some will get stuck to the napkin if you use that method to dry them. Just gently scrape them off. A little bit of napkin in the soil will not hurt anything.

There are many methods of germinating pepper seeds. I prefer directly into moist soil.

Some people like to wet a napkin or paper towel, wring it out until its moist, put the seeds onto it and fold it over the seeds. This is then placed into a ziplock baggie, and placed in a warm place until the seeds sprout. I like this method for some seeds, but not for pepper seeds. They are very small and fragile, and I just don’t prefer the wet paper towel method for them.

 

Pepper Seeds Planted Directly into the Soil

 

Covered

Container with Pepper Seeds Covered

Container with Pepper Seeds Covered

 

After just about a week or so, the seeds sprouted. Here is a pic of young pepper sprouts. They suffered some setbacks because I put them into full sun way too soon. Now they are recovering in the shade on the balcony.

Hot Pepper Sprouts in the Shade

Hot Pepper Sprouts in the Shade


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